Dental Blog

Guys, Gum Disease Is Serious, And Here’s Why

Friday, June 8, 2018
Mens-health

We would be remiss to let a very important week slip by without discussing it on the blog. Any guesses what it is? This week (June 11-17) is National Men’s Health Week. So what does men’s health have to do with oral health? If you read our post last month on oral issues related to women’s health, you know they are quite connected.

It’s common knowledge that smoking and chewing tobacco is strongly discouraged by doctors as it increases risk of cancer. Males are more than twice as likely to develop oral cancer than women, due to more frequent tobacco and alcohol use. Not to mention, tobacco use contributes to bad breath, stained teeth, dulled sense of taste and smell, and prolonged recovery from oral surgery.

Avoiding tobacco and sticking to a daily routine of brushing and flossing is the easiest and most accessible way to keep your smile healthy and protected from gum disease, which is the gateway to many men’s health issues. Statistics show that 34% of men ages 30 to 54 and 56% ages 55 to 90 have some form of gum disease. Averages for women are about 10% less for each of those age brackets.

Brushing and flossing inconsistently increases the amount of bacteria that builds up at the gumline. That bacteria turns into plaque and that plaque turns into to tartar, which is difficult to clean off your teeth. Gums, at this point, might become sensitive to where you’ll notice inflammation and even pockets developing between the gums and teeth. This is stage 1 periodontal disease (aka gum disease). From here, the bacteria that once collected at the gum line can infiltrate the bloodstream below and spread disease throughout the body.

Maintaining good oral hygiene practices will not only benefit your teeth and gums, but also your overall health for years to come. Now that is something to smile about.